Odd Balls

39 Strawberry Tree – Arbutus unedo Edible, and very tasty, so I am led to believe. If you bother to hover, some information you will discover. Cee’s Odd Ball Challenge:Week 39 – Strawberry Tree

Odd Apples

Odd Apples Oak Apple – Biorhiza pallida.  This is actually a gall cause by the wasp, Biorhiza pallida. The galls are formed after the wasp lays eggs inside the leaf buds and the plant tissues swell as the larvae of the gall wasp develop inside. Quince Apples, Chaenomeles speciosa, commonly known as flowering quince, Chinese quince, …

Tests, Everyday Events

TESTS! To lay down each night and fall to sleep, it is a test we all have the  need to pass To wake each morn and take a conscious breath, a test we now know we have passed. To work through the trials and tribulations of the day,  we have all passed another test. We have got through…

Macro Moment in Light Green

Oncotylus viridiflavus Oncotylus viridiflavus is a species of plant bug belonging to the family Miridae, subfamily Phylinae. It is found in every country of Central, south Europe and Scandinavia Widely scattered across central and southern England and parts of Wales, most often found on the flowering heads of knapweed, the food plant. Adult: July-September Length…

Jackdaw Close Up

  Corvus monedula: A Jackdaw fledgling found to be in distress, although no blood was seen, it couldn’t fly. Being as it was in a vulnerable position openly exposed at the base of a busy lane hedge, and liable to dog and cat attacks, it  was picked up and taken to the local wildlife hospital….

Readers’ wildlife photographs — Why Evolution Is True

Reader Karen Bartelt sends picture of Giant Tortoises from the Galápagos, despite the variation, they are all subspecies of one species, Chelonidis nigra. Karen describes them as Geochelone, which is the genus of the ancestral species from South America, but there may have been some taxonomic revision of the group. It’s not easy to see…

A study has highlighted the risk posed by projected climate change on the world’s ability to grow enough food. A US team of researchers found that forecasted shifts in climate by 2070 would occur too quickly for species of grass to adapt to the new conditions.

Originally posted on Like For Real Dough:
A study has highlighted the risk posed by projected climate change on the world’s ability to grow enough food. A US team of researchers found that forecasted shifts in climate by 2070 would occur too quickly for species of grass to adapt to the new conditions. http://ift.tt/2df0rnb