BAD BLOOD

Bad blood: Animals that can infect humans with zoonosis or zoonotic illnesses. Here’s a list of animals that are known to carry diseases that can be passed on to humans.

Cat’s

Cat-scratch disease: Licking and scratching – favourite activities of felines – can cause this disease. Scratching transmits Bartonella henselae, the causing agent of cat scratch disease (CSD), to humans, leading to swollen lymph nodes.

Rat’s


Rats can serve as zoonotic vectors for certain pathogens and thus spread disease, such as bubonic plague, Lassa fever, leptospirosis, and Hantavirus infection.

Mosquito

Malaria: Read more   – Yellow fever: Read more  – Chikungunya  – West Nile fever: Read more  – Dengue fever: Read more  – Filariasis: Read more  – Zika virus: Read more  – Arbovirus: Read more – Elephantiasis: Read more

Livestock


Bovine Tuberculosis: Mycobacterium bovis: Read more  – Brucellosis: Read more  – E . coli can be contracted from livestock in general, but always take heed of the advice given in petting zoo’s : Escherichia coli: Read more  –  Leptospirosis. Flu: Also contracted through petting livestock. Q fever: Read more  – Rift valley fever: Read more

Dog’s

Collage of Nine Dogs.jpg

Toxocariasis: Read more  Also passed on by digesting its eggs  from cat’s, and foxes.

Hamster’s

Lymphocytic choriomeningitis: Read more  – Even more

Reptile’s

Reptile: Reptilia, comprising today’s turtles, crocodilians, snakes, amphisbaenians, lizards, tuatara, and their extinct relatives. The study of these traditional reptile orders, historically combined with that of modern amphibians, is called herpetology. Read more:  – Salmonella: Causes

  • Contaminated food, often having no unusual look or smell
  • Poor kitchen hygiene, especially problematic in institutional kitchens and restaurants because this can lead to a significant outbreak
  • Excretions from either sick or infected but apparently clinically healthy people and animals (especially dangerous are caregivers and animals)
  • Polluted surface water and standing water (such as in shower hoses or unused water dispensers)
  • Unhygienically thawed poultry (the meltwater contains many bacteria)
  • An association with reptiles (pet tortoises, snakes, iguanas, and aquatic turtles) is well described.
  • Amphibians such as frogs
  • Read more

Raccoons, Bat’s and Woodchuck’s

Rabies: Read more

Pig’s

Trichinosis: Round worms: Read more:  – Cysticercosis: Read more

Deer Tick

Lyme disease: Read More

Tsetse fly

Tsetsemeyers1880.jpg

Sleeping sickness: Read more

Armadillo

Leprosy: Read more and more

Parrot’s

Psittacosis: Read more

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4 Comments Add yours

  1. Well, i’m glad my parrots can’t give me anything… (psittacosis aside)! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Mick Talbot says:

      Don’t tempt providence. There is a story as to why I posted the article, apart from helping folk to be aware of the diseases that can be contracted from animals, it is more about what I might of caught off my cat. I’ll write about it soon, if it is confirmed.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Mick Talbot says:

      I’ll get back to you soon Tom.

      Like

      1. Mick Talbot says:

        I’m back ☺ My trip to the Doctors was because I have swollen lymph glands for which I could not account for, and although I was prescribed a course of antibiotics, I was given no actual reason as to why I am suffering. I was in fact referred to an ear, nose, and throat consultant, Why, well I am suffering with one of the many side effects brought on by diabetes, namely the inability to salivate whilst asleep. So that being the case and the fact that I could find no connection to swollen lymph glands in my lower body I delved deeper and came up with “Cat scratching fever”, a condition that affects l. glands, specific to areas of the body that had been scratched, bitten, or in the case of lacerations derived from minor accidents, licked. Well I have a cat, and although it has never bitten me, at least not as an adult, it dose inflict the occasional blood drawing scratch. As for being licked? Well I’m sure it has, not that I ever record such happenings. So hoping you never become infected with psittacosis, take care though,

        Mick

        PS Re the latter I had a friend call Charlie, although no longer in my keeping I will post some photos of him soon.

        Like

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